why this blog?

Likelihood Ratio (LR) in Emergency Medicine

7/21/2012

Goodbye nasogastric lavage!


Clinical Scenario

A 84 yo woman arrives in ED in midnight coming from a nursing because of a reported episode of coffee ground vomiting. 
Respiratory rate, heart rate and blood pressure are normal, abdomen is not distended, hemoglobin level is 10 g/dl. On rectal examination you find normal stool. 
She takes warfarin. 


Can a nasogasric lavage (NGL) contribute to rule out an upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGB)? 

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7/11/2012

Can Ultrasound rule out a pneumothorax?



video


Clinical Scenario

You are allerted for a level 3 trauma from the mountain, a cyclist has fallen going down hill.
You prepar the shock room with everything you may need, dress up, and wait.
A 25 y/o cyclist arrives completely immobilized, you immidiately start to  perform ABCDE as you learned in your recent ATLS course (you feel confident).
First stop is a possible problem in “B” (breathing): he has an ecchimosis on the right emithorax, not crepitation, maybe there is a less vescicular murmur on the same side, but you are not sure (the shock room is very crowded an noisy!), he is slightely tachypnoic (RR is 24), O2 saturation is 96%. …you go on….in “E” (Exposure) you find an exposed, bleeding, thigh bone fracture that surly is going to need surgery, at the moment you stop the bleeding, stabilize, allert orthopedic…ect…
FAST is normal. You ask for X-Ray : anteroposterior (AP) chest x-ray, pelvis and thigh bone. Confirmed exposed fracture, no signs of pneumothorax, surgery room is ready…
You recently have reeded the previous post and you don't feel confident about a negative thorax x ray, so you decide to “extend” your FAST and on the right emithorax you find a "lung point"...


are you going to let this patient be intubated?


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7/02/2012

Thoracic trauma and chest X-Ray


Clinical Scenario

You are alerted for a level 3 trauma coming from the mountain, a cyclist has fallen going down hill.
You prepare the shock room with everything you may need, dress up, and wait.
A 25 y/o cyclist arrives completely immobilized, you immediately start to  perform ABCDE as you learned in your recent ATLS course (...you feel confident).
First stop is a possible problem in “B” (breathing): he has an ecchimosis on the right emithorax, not crepitation, maybe there is a less vescicular murmur on the same side, but you are not sure (the shock room is very crowded an noisy!), he is slightely tachypnoic (RR is 24), O2 saturation is 96%. …you go on….in “E” (Exposure) you find an exposed, bleeding, thigh bone fracture that surly is going to need surgery, at the moment you stop the bleeding, stabilize, allert orthopedic…ect…
FAST is normal. You ask for X-Ray: anteroposterior (AP) chest x-ray, pelvis and thigh bone. Radiologist confirms exposed fracture, no signs of pneumothorax, surgery room is ready...


…Do you still feel confident?

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